Mining

Have your say on managing old mine sites

The Palaszczuk Government is asking Queenslanders to help shape the future of the state’s old mine sites.

Speaking from the old Mount Chalmers Gold Mine near Rockhampton, Mines Minister Dr Anthony Lynham said the Abandoned Mines Discussion Paper being released today was an opportunity for Queenslanders to provide feedback on how to manage old mine sites.

“From the gold rush of the late 1800s to the earliest days of coal, zinc, copper and lead, Queensland has a rich mining history which remains a major economic contributor to this day,” Dr Lynham said.

“But with this rich history comes a legacy of old  mine sites which we are currently managing from a safety and environmental perspective.

“With mining technology evolving over the past century these old mines can also offer us opportunities to re-commercialise them using contemporary practices and techniques to get them restarted.

“Queensland is leading from the front in repurposing old mine sites – as demonstrated by the Kidston Solar Project as just one shining example.

“What was once the focal point of gold mining in Queensland is now a $126 million solar farm – a gold mine for jobs and renewable energy in North Queensland.

“Similarly, after the disclaiming of the Texas Silver Mine the Palaszczuk Government improved the site’s water management infrastructure to prevent any spillage into the surrounding environment and then facilitated the mine’s re-commercialisation, with it being handed to a new mining company in October 2017.

“Mount Chalmers, which has been managed by the government since November 2017, is another that could be re-purposed or re-used.

“Two discussion papers will be released for feedback on a range of reform ideas.

“One paper is for feedback on how we manage the state’s abandoned mine sites.

“The other paper is for feedback on how to monitor and manage risks with current mining operations that enter our care and maintenance, are disclaimed or change ownership.

“We’re seeking feedback from the community, all industries and traditional owners on how to continue to nurture the best possible rehabilitation and economic outcomes for Queenslanders.

“Whether it be re-purposing, re-commercialising or re-mediating, this feedback will be vital in determining the path we take,” Dr Lynham said.

Public submissions for the reports will close at 5pm, on July 16. Provide input or view the discussion papers here.

If you enjoyed this post, please consider leaving a comment or subscribing to our FREE eNewsletter to have future articles delivered directly to your inbox.



There are no comments

Add yours