Bawdwin Drilling_Jan18

Major Drilling Campaign Starts at T3 Dome Complex

  • Major drilling campaign commences at T3 Dome Complex
  • EM points to a series of large conductive domes, spread over wide area
  • 7 ‘buried domes’ to be drilled initially, ~60 DD holes planned (Phase 1)


MOD Resources Ltd (ASX: MOD) is pleased to announce commencement of drilling to test a wide range of new targets along the Company’s extensive T3 Dome Complex. The commencement of drilling follows completion of a public review of the Environmental Management Plan announced 4 April 2018.

Drill rigs have been mobilised at the A4 Dome, 8km west of T3 and at the A1 Dome, 20km northeast of T3.

The ~1,000km2 T3 Dome, now described as a ‘complex’ given the growing number of targets, forms part of a joint venture with AIM-listed Metal Tiger Plc (30%). The JV holds extensive licences operated by in-country subsidiary, Tshukudu Metals Botswana (Pty) Ltd (Tshukudu) extending 200km along the central and western parts of the Kalahari Copper Belt in Botswana.

MOD’s Managing Director, Mr Julian Hanna said that state-of-the-art processing and interpretation of airborne EM data by Tshukudu’s very experienced consultants has uncovered compelling new drilling targets spread over a wide area of the T3 Dome Complex (Figures 1-6 in ASX release).

“What is extraordinary is that the EM interpretation appears to have defined seven large ‘buried’ conductive domes, several with very similar geometries and internal structures to the T-Rex Dome which underlies T3”, Mr Hanna explained.

“With a strong balance sheet and a very experienced team on site to manage the drilling, MOD is entering an exciting new phase to unlock the potential of this large, under-explored region of the Kalahari Copper Belt”, he said.

T3 Dome Complex

The >400Kt T3 copper deposit, which is progressing through a feasibility study towards a decision to mine, occurs above the T-Rex Dome, the only dome where any drilling has been conducted to date.

Processing and interpretation of airborne EM data to approximately 500m depth, the limit of the EM data, has defined (at least) seven conductive domes within the T3 Dome Complex.

The domes are generally >5km long, 1-2km wide and are interpreted to be associated with shallow angle thrusting and stacking of the prospective copper belt sediments. The interpretation appears to have defined not only the conductive ‘shell’ but also the internal structure of several domes.

The tops of several domes are interpreted to start from approximately 50-100m below surface. Other domes are interpreted to start from approximately 200-300m depth and as a result are less well defined.

Cross sections of interpreted EM data from five domes showing initial planned drill holes are included in this release.  The distinctive EM conductor at T3 appears to be associated with a ~40m thick, locally carbonaceous shale unit with varying degrees of alteration and veining, intersected in many T3 drill holes (T3 ‘Marker Unit’).

The initial objective of the drilling is to confirm if the prospective sequence occurs within the interpreted domes.  Holes are being drilled in areas of structural complexity to test for vein hosted deposits of the ‘T3 type’ and test the underlying prospective Ngwako Pan Formation (NPF) contact, which hosts other substantial copper deposits in the eastern part of the Kalahari Copper Belt.

Drilling is initially testing domes with similarities to the T-Rex Dome. Depending on results, approximately 60 diamond core drill holes have been budgeted during the first phase of drilling along the T3 Dome Complex.

Eight DD drill rigs are currently on site with two additional rigs expected soon.  The rigs are deployed at the following projects:  T3 Dome Complex, T1 Underground Resource Extension, T3 Underground Resource and T3 Pit Project – geotechnical and sterilisation drilling.

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